Monthly Archives: May 2008

Money Deposit Worksheet

Money Deposit Worksheet

This is a simple worksheet I made to organize the various bills and coins received from school fundraisers. It can be used two ways: either digital as a functioning spreadsheet that automatically calculates amounts or printed and filled out manually. It has simplified my efforts considerably and more than made up for the time I spent creating it. I hope you can benefit from it too.

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Total Points to Percentages Lookup Sheet Generator

Total Points to Percentages Lookup Sheet Generator

Ever used one of those old-fashioned slide rules to calculate a grade out of 100% when you had an odd number of questions? Well, I didn’t know about those things when I first started teaching. So, the very first year I taught I made my own using a spreadsheet.

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Instructions

  1. Open the spreadsheet
  2. Enter the “Total Number of Questions” (and “Total Curve”, if desired) in the boxes indicated.
  3. Select the “Percent Grades” tab to view and print.

Cell Phone vs Bible

Gadget Bag January 2006

I wonder what would happen if we treated our Bible like we treat our cell phone?

  • What if we carried it around in our purses or pockets?
  • What if we flipped through it several times a day?
  • What if we turned back to go get it if we forgot it?
  • What if we used it to receive messages from the text?
  • What if we treated it like we couldn’t live without it?
  • What if we gave it to kids as gifts?
  • What if we used it when we traveled?
  • What if we used it in case of emergency?

This is something to make you go: “Hmm. Where is my Bible?

Oh, and one more thing. Unlike our cell phone, we don’t have to worry about our Bible being disconnected because Jesus already paid the bill! And no dropped calls!

Makes you stop and think “What are my priorities?

Photo courtesy of www.flickr.com/photos/41894168820@N01/84294702

Question Review with Jenga and Bandu

www.flickr.com/photos/24348079@N00/306430750
Call it what you will whether Tumbling Tower, Falling Blocks, Jenga, or Ta-Ka-Radi you can use this simple and inexpensive game to keep players motivated during a review session. In Jenga, the goal is to remove a block from the tower and stack it on top without making the tower fall. When using this game for review, the number of players doesn’t matter and neither does the content of the questions being asked. It’s quite versatile. I hope your players enjoy it as much as my students.

You can also use a kind of reverse-Jenga game called Bandu (published by Milton Bradley and based on a game calls Bausack). In Bandu, the goal is to build a tower on a base using pieces that are all differently shaped. The wooden pieces range from “normal” shapes like rods, beams, cones, and hoops to “unusual” shapes like trapezoids, cut cylinders, a goblet, and even an egg! Players take turns choosing a random building piece that they must integrate into their tower without making it fall. The winner is the player (or team) with the last tower standing.

Jenga Rules

  • Split players into teams.
  • Ask questions of individual players on teams in rotation so that everyone has a chance to answer.
    • Team A’s Player 1, Team B’s Player 1, Team C’s Player 1, THEN Team A’s Player 2, Team B’s Player 2, Team C’s Player 2, THEN Team A’s Player 3, etc.
  • Students who INCORRECTLY answer a question must remove a block. The block removed must be below the top-most completed layer of the tower.
  • Students who CORRECTLY answer a question choose a person from another team to remove a Jenga block. The block removed must be below the top-most completed layer of the tower. No one can be chosen more than 3 times in a row.
  • The winning team is the one that causes a player from another team to knock over the tower.

Bandu Rules

  • Split players into teams.
  • Ask questions of individual players on teams in rotation so that everyone has a chance to answer.
    • Team A’s Player 1, Team B’s Player 1, Team C’s Player 1, THEN Team A’s Player 2, Team B’s Player 2, Team C’s Player 2, THEN Team A’s Player 3, etc.
  • Students who INCORRECTLY answer a question must choose a piece randomly and integrate it into the team’s tower. No one can be chosen more than 3 times in a row.
  • Students who CORRECTLY answer a question choose a person from another team to integrate a random piece into their team’s tower.
  • The winning team is the one that causes a player from another team to knock over the tower.

Photo courtesy of www.flickr.com/photos/24348079@N00/306430750

So You Want To Develop An Advanced Web Site, Huh?

Career-Technical Education Summer Conference 2007
Business & Information Technology Education
Pre-Conference Sessions
Tuesday, July 24, 2007; 8:00 a.m. – 2:30 p.m.
The Joseph S. Koury Convention Center
The Sheraton
Greensboro Hotel at Four Seasons, Greensboro, NC, USA

Topics

References

Downloads

From HTML to XHTML and Beyond: XHTML Coding for e-Commerce I Teachers

Career-Technical Education Summer Conference 2006
Business & Information Technology Education
Pre-Conference Sessions
Monday, July 17, 2006; 8:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
The Joseph S. Koury Convention Center
The Sheraton Greensboro Hotel at Four Seasons, Greensboro, NC, USA

Topics

  • Introduction to XHTML including step-by-step instructions from the ground up
  • XHTML compared and contrasted with HTML
  • Brief History of Markup Languages including SGML, HTML, XML
  • Common mistakes
  • Summary of Coding Rules for both HTML and XHTML
  • The use of helper programs including Notepad, Textpad, Microsoft Word, Microsoft Publisher, and Macromedia Dreamweaver
  • Books, Reference Materials, etc.
  • Brief summary of Firefox Features and Extensions including Web Developer and Color-Coded Page Source
  • The basic structure of a web page
  • Tags, RGB Hexadecimal Color Codes, Entities, and Extensions including JavaScript and Stylesheets
  • Standards, Accessibility, www.usability.gov Guidelines, and Browser Wars
  • Lots and lots of hands-on examples

Downloads

Common Web Design Mistakes

Introduction

Too often I visit web sites that are, well, not well-made. They suffer from common design mistakes that make the sites look amateurish. It’s all too common. If the designers of those sites followed the Research-Based Web Design and Usability Guidelines as developed by the National Cancer Institute, they wouldn’t have so many problems. The following are excerpts from those guidelines plus a few of my own recommendations thrown in:

General

  • Type all HTML tags using lowercase letters. Although HTML is not case-sensitive, XML is. XML requires all HTML tags to be lowercase. Thus, if there is even the slightest chance you will be upgrading your pages in the future you DEFINITELY want your pages to be ready.

Colors

  • Include the pound sign (#) at the beginning of all RGB Hexadecimal Color Codes. Some versions of the Netscape browser require this in order to display the color.
  • NEVER use blue (#0000FF) or purple (#660099) as a text color. Since these are the default colors for hyperlinks, visitors to your site can become confused when they mistake blue or purple text for a hyperlink.
  • Use a lighter colored background with darker colored text so it’s easier to print your pages. When a browser prepares a page for printing, the background is omitted by default. Thus, if your text is a light color like, say, yellow, then YELLOW text might print out on your WHITE paper.
  • Use a lighter colored background with darker colored text so it’s easier to read your pages. (Seriously, it’s actually been tested! It’s easier to read darker print on a lighter background.)
  • NEVER use blue (#0000FF) or purple (#660099) as a background color. Since these are the default colors for hyperlinks and visitors to your site can override your colors, it is possible for hyperlinks to be invisible against the background.

Images

  • Use only GIF or JPG images in your web pages. Only these two image types are widely supported as a web standard although the PNG file type is rapidly becoming a third.
  • NEVER use a photograph for a background. Background images on web pages MUST tile and most photographs don’t tile well. Furthermore, it is often difficult to read text on a page with a photograph for a background.
  • NEVER insert a large image into a web page and then resize the appearance of the image in the page by manipulating the width and height attributes. Instead, resize the image itself in an external editor to be the intended size for your web page and save it that way. Then insert. This will cut down on wasted bandwidth and slow loading times for visitors.
  • ALWAYS use relative referencing to insert images into your web sites. Check your work on another computer to make sure your images load properly.
  • ALWAYS include ALT text for images that are part of your content. (Ignore this rule for images that are part of the site theme like bullets, horizontal bars, etc.) – Thanks to SEO Gal in Toronto

Navigation

  • Include the World Wide Web moniker (www.) at the beginning of all web site URLs. Some versions of the Firefox browser and some incorrectly certified web sites require this in order to be displayed.
  • Navigational hyperlinks should be grouped together in an organized way. Usually, this means they should line up either horizontally across the page or vertically down the left side.
  • Your navigation should ALWAYS be located near the top of each page.
  • A link to your home page should ALWAYS be the first hyperlink in your navigation.
  • AVOID including anything in your navigation that is not a hyperlink. Better to link to a page that says “Under Construction” or “Coming Soon” than not be a hyperlink at all. Visitors to your site may become confused when they assume text is clickable because it is found near other hyperlinks.

Text

  • NEVER underline text on a web page. Since hyperlinks are underlined by default, users can become confused when they mistake underlined text for a hyperlink.
  • NEVER set the size attribute of the font tag. Since visitors to your site can override your sizes, it is possible for your site to display incorrectly. Use the Heading tags instead.